Volume 8, Issue 1, March 2020, Page: 1-9
Effectiveness of Alternative Conservation Means in Protecting the Osun-osogbo Sacred Grove in South-West, Nigeria
Adesoji Akinwumi Adeyemi, Department of Forest Resources Management, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria
Tolulope Hannah Oyinloye, Department of Forest Resources Management, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria
Received: Dec. 27, 2019;       Accepted: Jan. 7, 2020;       Published: Jan. 17, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.plant.20200801.11      View  401      Downloads  148
Abstract
Osun-Osogbo Grove has great cultural histories, but the impacts on biodiversity conservation are hardly captured with many of the component parts unreported. Adequate knowledge of the effectiveness of these traditional means as a sustainable alternative to failed-conventional engagements is worthwhile. Therefore, we investigated some cultural norms, beliefs and traditions and their effectiveness in adequately protecting biodiversity in the grove. Purposive sampling technique was adopted for questionnaire administrations on staff, tourists and the households in the surrounding communities. Three sets of questionnaires were administered on the local residents, staff and custodians of the grove as well as the grove management and custodians. Information was obtained on traditional laws and taboos associated with the grove, and their effectiveness. The coordinates of the referenced cultural values were taken using a GPS receiver Photographs of all relevant features were also taken to substantiate key observations. The taboos identified within the site were farming, killing of animals, fishing, felling of trees, and pollution of the environment and unauthorized building of structures. Tourists’ visitations to OOSG were age, gender, religion and education-level dependent. The traditional norms and customs were found to be very potent in protecting the area over conventional laws.
Keywords
Traditional Means, Culture, Taboos, Community Participation
To cite this article
Adesoji Akinwumi Adeyemi, Tolulope Hannah Oyinloye, Effectiveness of Alternative Conservation Means in Protecting the Osun-osogbo Sacred Grove in South-West, Nigeria, Plant. Vol. 8, No. 1, 2020, pp. 1-9. doi: 10.11648/j.plant.20200801.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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